Intelligent home automation system: controlling house temperature with a multimedia touch screen display, mounted on an apartment wall and wireless connected to a main computer unit. Intelligent system for energy saving, climate control and environmental conservation. Temperature is expressed in Fahrenheit degrees (see more images from my portfolio for other units). Shows thermometer, warm and cold air conditioning icons, relative humidity and current temperature.

Embracing popular home technology covers everything from climate control in your home to security around the perimeter of your property. (Getty Images)

With technology continuing to be a growing presence in every aspect of life, the home is no exception. While popular smart home technologies such as Amazon Alexa and Echo, Google Home and Apple HomePod provide users with an array of high-tech functions such as playing music and accessing information from the internet, smart home technology today has advanced even further. Homeowners are presented with a versatile selection of new systems including smart thermostats, light bulbs, plugs, locks and doorbells that offer a new level of intelligence to the everyday home.

Read on to discover some of the latest smart devices in home technology that will elevate your home in the new year. Maybe it'll even inspire some holiday gifts for family and friends.

[See: 9 Interior Design Trends to Look Out for in 2019.]

Nest Learning Thermostat
$249 at Nest.com

The Nest thermostat adapts as the seasons change and learns your preferred temperatures throughout the day. Shortly after it's installed, Nest’s temperature settings will acclimatize according to your preferences – cool at night as you hop into bed and a warm 72 degrees in the morning before your cup of joe, for example. When you head to work, Nest uses your phone’s location to determine if you’ve left and enters eco mode, saving energy and reducing bills by up to 15 percent, according to the company.

Sengled Smart LED Floodlight
$149.99 at Sengled.com

The Sengled Smart LED Floodlight with Wi-Fi includes a built-in camera complete with night vision and motion detection. You can get an alert on your phone when any motion is detected and monitor your home from anywhere using the compatible app. In addition, the lightbulb comes equipped with a built-in microphone and speaker, so you can two-way talk with family and look out for your pets.

[See: 7 Tips for Updating Your House in an Up-and-Coming Neighborhood.]

Teckin Smart Plug
$22.99 at Amazon.com

Teckin’s Smart Plug can control your home appliances through voice commands to your Amazon Alexa, Echo or Google Assistant. By plugging electronics like lamps or a room humidifier into the Smart Plug, you can schedule to automatically turn them on and off as needed, and you can create custom schedules for traveling and energy-saving purposes.

August Smart Lock
$149 to $279 at August.com

Keyless entry to your home is gaining popularity for increased security and ease of use, and smart lock brand August offers that access with its total control home lock system. The August Smart Lock allows users to lock or unlock their home from anywhere at any time via the smartphone app. The company's step-up option, Smart Lock Pro, can even be voice activated, compatible with Siri, Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant.

[See: 7 New Year's Resolutions for Your Home to Start Now.]

Nest Hello
$229 at Nest.com

In addition to its home climate control technology, Nest offers home security options as well, including its smart doorbell. Residents using Nest Hello have 24/7 access to high-definition video streaming from their doorstep. The camera in the doorbell has night vision for when it's dark out, 160-degree views and visitor detection alerts. Nest Hello includes a speaker and microphone that allows you to speak to people at your door without having to be there. You also have the option to prerecord messages, look back at previous footage and receive special detection alerts and visuals for visitors and packages.


Is Your Home Alone for the Holidays? How to Keep Your House Bandit-Free

Keep the burglars at bay without the booby traps.

(Getty Images)

When your family goes out of town for the holidays, fingers crossed, you won’t leave a kid behind. But then who’s going to keep your home safe from the criminals waiting to pounce on an empty house or apartment? There’s no need to call on Kevin McCallister of "Home Alone" if you follow these ways to secure your home before you take off for the holidays.

Lock up.

Lock up.

A bright blue front door with a stainless steel knob

(Getty Images)

It’s obvious – maybe too obvious – but it’s easy for homeowners to forget to do a final check on the door handle when they’re juggling suitcases, presents for family and a road trip’s worth of snacks. If you don’t lock up, you’re making it easy on criminals. “The burglars are most likely coming through the front door,” says Chris McGoey, a crime prevention expert based in Los Angeles. Before you leave, double-check that doors and windows are locked, and try the front door as you leave to ensure it’s completely secure.

Go for a monitored security system.

Go for a monitored security system.

Pushing Alarm. Woman's hand, connecting a home alarm

(Getty Images)

When shopping around for a home security system, you can opt for monitored or unmonitored systems. A monitored system requires an annual fee but is tracked by a security company, which can contact local authorities if an alarm goes off. With an unmonitored system, “There’s no security company on call if your alarm goes off,” says Sarah Brown, home and community safety expert for home security information company SafeWise. If you're planning an extended holiday vacation where you might not notice a mobile update right away, Brown recommends a monitored system.

Go high-tech with your doorbell.

Go high-tech with your doorbell.

door security with camera intercom

(Getty Images)

If you want to increase your security before burglars even try to break in, a remote-access video doorbell is an effective option. David DeMille – a home security expert and website manager for ASecureLife.com, a personal security ratings and rankings website – explains that if you're not home, you can voice answer through your phone when someone rings your doorbell – potentially to case the property as a break-in target. A voice answer will likely send criminals away, even if they can tell you’re responding from somewhere else. “Either way, they know you’re watching,” DeMille says.

Be diligent.

Be diligent.

A man carrying a suitcase about to walk out the front door of his house to travel.

(Getty Images)

When you’re rushing to get out of the house and on the road, it can be tough to go through a laundry list of tasks to ensure your home is secure. But it’s useful to be in the habit already – whether it’s activating your security system, double-checking the deadbolt or setting light timers. “There’s always human error. The old theory’s true: If it can go wrong, it will go wrong,” says Paul Ciepiela, president of the Maryland Crime Prevention Association and a detective for Baltimore County Police.

Get to know your neighbors.

Get to know your neighbors.

Two men talking near plants in a garden.

(Getty Images)

Unlike in “Home Alone,” chances are slim that the entire neighborhood will be out of town. If you’re friendly with the people on your block – in a neighborhood watch or otherwise – those who stick around during the holidays are more likely to think twice if they see something out of the ordinary. “Community involvement is a huge factor in home safety and recovering things,” Brown says, noting that people who live on a cul-de-sac often have low risk of burglary because they interact with each other more and know their neighbors' comings and goings.

Call on friends to collect the mail.

Call on friends to collect the mail.

(Getty Images)

“Don’t let newspapers or sales [fliers] pile up at your door. It is an indication to a burglar that no one is home,” says Commander Leslie Parsons of the Metropolitan Police Department in the District of Columbia. It helps to have a neighbor or friend pick up mail, newspapers and fliers on a regular basis, but you can also hold post office mail and newspaper delivery for the duration you’re gone and reschedule package delivery from UPS or FedEx for after you return.

Beware of burglar-friendly landscaping.

Beware of burglar-friendly landscaping.

Front Yard Garden with Heather Foliage, Golden Japanese Forest Grass, Helmond Pillar Barberry, and Japanese Maple

(Getty Images)

Bushes and trees that hide windows and doors from the street can be ideal cloaking for a burglar trying to sneak into your home. But you can landscape to deter criminals as well. Your landscaping should ensure there’s no easy place to hide and make it difficult to get close to windows. “Putting bushes underneath windows, especially ones that have thorns, can be a great deterrent,” DeMille says. Lighted walkways, motion-detecting spotlights and a front porch light also help prevent potential burglars from getting a good look at your home's interior.

Time the lights.

Time the lights.

"a beautiful villa taken at dusk with all interior and external lights switched on. In the background, conifers and winter trees are silhouetted against the rich blue evening sky. In the foreground, a large driveway is partially lit by the exterior lights.Looking for exterior views of Luxury Homes and Buildings... then please see my other images by clicking on the lightbox Link below...A>A"

(Getty Images)

A dark house all night is a good sign the home is empty, but so is a house that stays lit all day. “Most burglaries happen between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.,” Brown says, noting it’s the lights that stay on all day that are the bigger indicator that the house is empty. Attach light timers to a few lamps throughout your home so they go on when it starts to get dark, then turn off in the morning.

Fake like someone's there.

Fake like someone's there.

(Getty Images)

You don’t need a cardboard cutout of Michael Jordan dancing around your living room to make it seem like someone’s home. TV simulator lights, like the one by FakeTV, are sold on Amazon and at stores such as Home Depot and Wal-Mart. “It actually throws colored lights up against the walls and it mimics the TV being on but uses a lot less electricity,” DeMille says. Set a timer on the TV light simulator and it looks like someone is watching TV for a few hours during the day and night.

Turn your phone ringer down.

Turn your phone ringer down.

Yellow rotary telephone sitting on a midcentury side table next to a retro upholstered chair.

(Getty Images)

An age-old strategy for burglars is to call a home phone line before attempting to break in. Even if the burglar isn’t the one calling, hearing the phone ringing without answer from outside can be enough to inspire a break-in. Brown explains: “Phone ringers are actually really loud, so that could be a signal no one’s home” if a potential burglar is scouting your house and hears the phone go to voicemail. To make it more difficult for criminals, turn the ringer down so it can’t be heard from outside the home.

Keep your live-tweeting to a minimum.

Keep your live-tweeting to a minimum.

Woman using laptop with a cup of coffee

(iStockphoto)

It may be hard to not document your Christmas trip to Hawaii all over Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter, but if your home is empty, it might be the best move. Friends, acquaintances and even strangers may see your airport selfie and make plans to stop by your empty abode while you’re away. “Saving your pictures until you get home would probably be a smarter idea,” Brown says.

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Tags: real estate, housing, home improvements


Sally Forster Jones is recognized as one of the top real estate brokers in Southern California. Forster Jones is an expert in the luxury real estate market in Los Angeles and internationally. Her extensive knowledge ranges from residential sales, luxury and architecturally significant properties to new developments and commercial transactions.

She is currently Executive Director of Luxury Estates with Compass in Beverly Hills, California. Her team, SFJ Group, is comprised of agents and a full-service staff ranging across experienced marketing, listing, transaction, and operation experts.

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