working seniors: A senior man stands on a ladder and cleans a roof gutter of a house

Cleaning your gutters is a common fall maintenance task. (Getty Images)

Owning a home comes with year-round responsibilities, but you don't have to dread these tasks. "Home maintenance is easier than people think," says Jim Magliaro, risk consulting technical lead at the insurance company Chubb. The key is to complete seasonal preventive measures which are more manageable and less expensive than the costly repairs that might be needed if household systems are neglected.

Here's a primer on the essential tasks to be completed each season of the year:

Spring can be an unpredictable time that brings snow, flooding and high winds, and Joe Meisinger, chief underwriting officer for personal insurance at Travelers, notes 30% of all home claims made to Travelers from 2009-2016 occurred in the spring. Household chores during these months focus on preparing for shifting weather patterns as well as cleaning up any damage from the winter months.

Here are important home maintenance tasks to complete in spring:

  • Clean out gutters.
  • Do an exterior inspection of your property.
  • Renovate with impact-resistant materials.
  • Check your sump pump.
  • Turn off water when on vacation.

[Read: The Guide to Home Renovations.]

Clean out gutters. Between snow melt and spring showers, there is the potential for a lot of water to be running through your downspouts. "Make sure drainage systems are clear and working properly," Magliaro advises.

Do an exterior inspection of your property. Those living in northern climates may not have spent a significant amount of time outside during the winter months. Even those in sunnier climates may not regularly inspect their home's exterior. The spring is a good time to look for missing shingles, loose siding and hanging branches.

Renovate with impact-resistant materials. Hail causes some of the most expensive damage in the spring, according to Meisinger. If you need to replace roofing or siding, use an impact-resistant material to avoid future damage. The Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety has developed a national standard that can be used as a checklist to guard against hurricane and wind damage.

Check your sump pump. Take action to ensure that water from outside doesn't cause damage inside. "This is a great time to go down to your basement and check your sump pump," Meisinger says. You can test that your sump pump is adding enough water to raise the pump's float and see if it is pumped out properly. For a more thorough evaluation, consult with a plumbing professional.

Summer

Summer is a perfect time to make sure your home systems are in working order. The warm weather also makes this season an ideal time to take care of outdoor tasks that can deter pests and minimize the chances of property damage later in the year.

Here are important home maintenance tasks to complete in summer:

  • Test GFCI outlets.
  • Secure outdoor furniture.
  • Add anchor bolts to doors.
  • Cut back vegetation.
  • Trim branches and remove dying trees.

Test GFCI outlets. Kitchens, bathrooms and other areas that may be exposed to moisture should be equipped with ground fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI, outlets. These outlets are designed to avoid electrical shocks and minimize the possibility of fires by shutting off the flow of electricity when a ground fault occurs. The easiest way to test that the outlets are working properly is to plug in a radio, turn it on and push the test button on the outlet. If the radio shuts off, the outlet is working as it should; if not, it should be replaced.

Secure outdoor furniture. Summertime storms can upend patio furniture and large equipment, such as trampolines and swing sets. Secure items to the ground or deck with anchors, bolts or cords, and properly store items when not in use. It may also be helpful to create a wind barrier around furniture by planting shrubbery or installing a decorative wall.

Add anchor bolts to doors. Meisinger says 27% of the home claims his company receives in the summer are related to wind damage. High winds can cause garage and house doors to fail, but anchor bolts help secure doors to the structure of a home. They may be especially useful in areas prone to tropical storms and hurricanes. If you are replacing a front door, Meisinger suggests getting one that opens out. That way, high winds will seal a door shut tightly, rather than trying to push it open.

Cut back vegetation. Keep pests at bay by trimming or removing vegetation that may be close to the house, advises Mike Malone, senior vice president of marketing and inside sales for pest control company Arrow Exterminators, based in Atlanta. Left unchecked, this greenery could attract and conceal insects, rodents and other wildlife.

Fall

Fall can be a busy season for household chores. "It's always a good time to prep the house for the winter," Meisinger says. That means getting heating systems in order and preparing for the cooler weather ahead.

Here are important home maintenance tasks to complete in fall:

  • Clean out gutters (again).
  • Add insulation.
  • Protect pipes.
  • Clean the chimney.
  • Inspect your HVAC system.

Clean out gutters (again). Falling leaves and debris can fill gutters and clog downspouts. In snowy climates, ice dams are the main hazard associated with clogged gutters going into the winter months. However, keeping gutters free of dirt and debris should help you avoid the problem.

Add insulation. Insulation is important not only for comfort, but also for protecting the integrity of your home. It can prevent ice dams and pipes from freezing and may protect against fires. However, be careful not to add too much insulation. People naturally create moisture in a house through cooking, cleaning and bathing. Too much insulation, combined with a lack of ventilation, means that moisture has no place to go and can lead to a wet attic and mold growth.

Protect pipes. Water pipes in crawl spaces, attics or basements may be prone to freezing in the winter. Adding insulation to a house is one way to prevent that from happening. Other ways to prevent freezing include plugging drafty cracks or holes in walls near pipes or wrapping them with foam or another insulating substance. Outdoor pipes, such as those for sprinkler systems, should be drained and their water source turned off to prevent frozen or burst pipes in the winter.

Clean the chimney. The fall is a good time to have a professional inspect and clean your chimney if you have a fireplace. They can remove creosote that has built up inside and check for other potential hazards such as bird nests and debris.

[Read: What You Need to Know About a Home Warranty.]

Winter

Ushering in ice and snow, winter can be a harsh time of the year in many parts of the country. Not only do homeowners need to protect their home against external damage from storms, but they need to address potentially devastating internal hazards. One-third of all home claim payouts made by Travelers in the winter are fire-related, according to Meisinger, making it the most expensive loss to incur during the season. However, you need to worry about pest control and internal air quality during the cold winter months as well.

Here are important home maintenance tasks to complete in winter:

  • Change the furnace filter.
  • Seal cracks and holes.
  • Update alarm and alert systems.
  • Clean out your dryer vent.
  • Review your insurance coverage.

Change the furnace filter. This isn't an annual task, but one that should occur every couple months during the heating season. "It's crucial to replace air filters every 30 to 90 days, monitor for abnormal sounds or smells, keep the outdoor unit free of dirt and debris and inspect the base pan for blocked drains," Orcutt says. Otherwise, you could be faced with less-efficient heating, higher utility bills and potential health hazards due to air pollution.



Seal cracks and holes. "Wildlife look for a warm environment to seek food and shelter from the frigid temperatures," Malone says. To ensure they aren't overwintering with you, seal exterior cracks or holes with caulking, foam or another filler. Make sure screens are firmly affixed over vents and other larger openings. Pay particular attention to the roofline, chimney and areas where pipes enter the house.

Update alarm and alert systems. Though they won't prevent a fire, alarm systems can minimize damage and save lives in the event of one. Homes should have a smoke alarm outside every bedroom and on every level of the house. Photoelectric alarms may be best at detecting smoldering fires that can fill a home with carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. "Maybe even get a smart smoke detector," Meisinger says. These devices will send phone alerts in the event a fire or carbon monoxide is detected.

[See: Don't Call the Handyman: 9 Quick Fixes You Can Do Yourself.]

Clean out your dryer vent. While you should be cleaning a dryer's lint trap after every use, vents need a deep cleaning at least once a year. Over time, lint can accumulate and even ignite. Check the vent hose and remove any accumulated buildup. Also, make sure the external vent is properly screened to prevent pests from accessing your home through it.

Review your insurance coverage. Not all home maintenance chores involve manual labor. As the calendar turns to a new year, it's a good time to review your homeowners insurance policy. If you've made improvements in the past year, make sure those will be adequately covered and consider shopping around for a better deal if you haven't compared insurance costs recently.


10 Home Renovations Under $5,000

Renovation options that aren't overly pricey.

Laying paving stone, just hands in gloves and a hammer in action, hammering on the paving stones.

(Getty Images)

Your house may be due for an update, but that doesn’t mean you have the cash on hand for the necessary renovations. A complete room remodel or significant addition to a home can cost well over $10,000, but you don’t have to spend every penny to make a difference. Whether you’re looking to save up for a larger renovation down the line or simply want to make a big impact with as little money as possible, here’s what you can do with a $5,000 budget.

(The following information is based on national averages and could vary based on the cost of skilled labor where you live.)

Exterior paint

Exterior paint

Busy House Painter Painting the Trim And Shutters of A Home.

(Getty Images)

For an exterior refresh, a new coat of paint on your house can yield a major transformation for a relatively small price. Even if you don’t select a new color, repainting your siding and trim can make your home's exterior look newer and stand out among other properties in your neighborhood. HomeAdvisor reports that the national average to paint a home exterior is just $2,802. The cost of this project may increase slightly if the type of siding on your home requires additional coats of paint or special materials, but homes two stories or less can likely be painted within a $5,000 budget.

Patio

Patio

Back yard patio with pool and deck.

(Getty Images)

You want the luxury of outdoor living, but you don’t necessarily have the budget for it. A wooden deck, complete with installation and finishing, will likely cost more than $10,000, according to home cost comparison site Fixr. But a patio is a simpler option that can achieve a similar look and feel for a fraction of the cost. Fixr reports that a 12-foot-by-16-foot patio costs, on average, $2,000. Patios are often built with brick, pavers, stone or concrete, depending on personal preference and the optimal material for your local climate and soil.

Interior paint

Interior paint

Couple preparing to paint living room

(Getty Images)

Paint is widely considered an inexpensive way to give a home a new look, so why not refresh every room? HomeAdvisor notes that the cost to have the average 10-foot-by-12-foot room painted professionally ranges from $380 to $790. Even at that maximum price, you could cover three bedrooms, a kitchen, dining room and living room within the $5,000 budget. Of course, painting the interior of a home is an easy task for some homeowners. The average cost to paint a home's interior is well within budget at $1,755, according to HomeAdvisor, in part because so many homeowners opt to make the relatively simple project a DIY task. Combined with rearranged furniture and a few new pieces of decor, fresh paint can give the house a completely different feel.

Hardwood floors

Hardwood floors

Professional installation of floor covering, the worker quickly and qualitatively mounts a laminate board

(Getty Images)

Hardwood floors can increase your home's value and are a desirable feature for many homeowners. While hardwood floors may be a pricier alternative to laminate or carpeting, installing them is feasible on a budget. HomeAdvisor reports the national average cost to install new wood flooring is $4,386. Of course, the final cost depends on the size of your home or the space you’re planning to renovate and the flooring material you choose. High-end wood flooring throughout a large floor plan can cost upwards of $10,000, according to HomeAdvisor.

Built-in bookshelves

Built-in bookshelves

Seating area in living room in moscow apartment;

(Getty Images)

Sprucing up a living room or home office can be a much simpler task than dealing with the plumbing or major appliances you’ll find in a kitchen or bathroom. But if you want to invest in a new focal point for the room you hang out in the most, consider built-in bookshelves. HomeAdvisor reports built-in shelves or cabinets cost, on average, $2,307, with custom design and installation reaching up to about $5,000. Bookcases offer an organization solution while also adding a desirable feature for your home’s future sale.

Kitchen appliances

Kitchen appliances

Professional gas range and range hood, white cabinet,  antique ceiling lamps, fine bone china teacups in cabinets. Chalk paint hand-painted stools. Antique brass fruit tray. Antique cherry wood tea tray.

(Getty Images)

If you’re hoping to renovate your kitchen, be aware that a complete overhaul will likely be well beyond a $5,000 budget. The 2019 U.S. Houzz Kitchen Trends Study, released in January, reports homeowners plan to spend a national median of $11,000 on a kitchen renovation alone. You can, however, tackle the parts of your kitchen that can make a major impact for a cheaper price. For better efficiency, consider new appliances throughout your kitchen. Luxury models can climb in price, but midrange kitchen suites that include a new refrigerator, range, dishwasher and microwave fall under a total of $5,000 for brands such as GE, Samsung, LG and Maytag at Home Depot, before installation and sales tax.

Kitchen countertops

Kitchen countertops

New black and white contemporary kitchen with subway tiles splashback

(Getty Images)

Another option for refreshing your kitchen for less is replacing your countertops, which can transform the look of the room. According to the Houzz Kitchen Trends study, 93 percent of respondents plan for new countertops in a kitchen remodel, making them the most popular feature to replace. Of course, if you’re looking to install rare Italian marble countertops, you may find yourself with a big bill. But butcher block, engineered quartz, stainless steel, laminate and some types of granite and marble can all be purchased and installed for less than $5,000 for 50 square feet. On average, new countertop installation costs $2,300, according to HomeAdvisor.

Shower or tub replacement

Shower or tub replacement

(Getty Images)

Like in the kitchen, a full bathroom remodel will likely exhaust an entire $5,000 budget and more, but a smaller-scale change may give the bathroom a new look that allows you to enjoy it more. Consider replacing your old shower or tub with a new one, which can cost between $400 and $4,500 on average, according to Fixr. Opting to move the location of the shower or purchasing a luxury tub could take you over budget, but a replacement shower with new fixtures and subway tiles could make the bathroom look new again without requiring a deep dive into your savings.

Open floor plan

Open floor plan

A sledge hammer is a great tool for removing unwanted drywall.

(Getty Images)

A major change with a high price tag may not be in the cards, but you can achieve maximum impact for less if you decide to embrace the ever-popular open floor plan. The cost to remove a wall varies if it involves electrical or plumbing or if the wall is load-bearing, meaning it’s vital to the structure of your home. Removal of a load-bearing wall in a single-story house averages between $1,200 and $3,000, according to HomeAdvisor, and falls within your $5,000 budget with money left over to even out the flooring and repaint. A load-bearing wall in a two-story house may get more expensive, however, reaching as much as $10,000 on average.

Closet system

Closet system

A large and luxurious walk-in wardrobe.

(iStockPhoto)

A new organization system for your closet can make life much easier, and with a clean closet you’re able to splurge and budget on what works best for you. Home improvement professionals network Thumbtack reports a custom closet installation typically costs between $2,000 and $6,000. The type of construction or closet brand you choose can help keep your total bill below $5,000. The Elfa brand from The Container Store, for example, offers custom-design options with pricing based on the cost of each individual piece. You can also choose existing closet designs, such as the Platinum Elfa Walk-In Closet, which is about $2,500 at full price with installation included, based on a 6-foot-by-8-foot closet.

Cost-effective home renovations

Cost-effective home renovations

Close up of unrecognizable house painter pouring paint while preparing it for home decoration.

(Getty Images)

Improve your home with these renovation projects for under $5,000:

  • Exterior paint.
  • Patio.
  • Interior paint.
  • Hardwood floors.
  • Built-in bookshelves.
  • Kitchen appliances.
  • Kitchen countertops.
  • Shower or tub replacement.
  • Open floor plan.
  • Closet system.

Read More

Updated on Aug. 26, 2019: This story was originally published on an earlier date and has been updated with new information.

Tags: real estate, housing, heating, home improvements


Maryalene LaPonsie has been writing for U.S. News & World Report since 2015 and covers topics including retirement, personal finance and Social Security. Ms. LaPonsie is also a regular contributor to Money Talks News and co-founder of Lowell’s First Look, a micro-news site for her local community.

With more than a decade of reporting experience, Ms. LaPonsie’s work has been featured on MSN, CBS MoneyWatch, Yahoo Finance, NerdWallet and numerous other sites on the web. She has been a guest of Consumer Talk with Michael Finney and The Steve Pomeranz Show.

A native of Michigan, Ms. LaPonsie received her bachelor’s degree from Western Michigan University. You can follow her on Twitter or connect with her on LinkedIn.

Recommended Articles

How to Back Out of a Real Estate Deal

Devon Thorsby | April 7, 2020

Here are your best options for backing out of buying or selling a home during the coronavirus pandemic.

Should You Delay Homebuying Right Now?

Wendy Arriz | April 6, 2020

While homebuyer activity has dropped in recent weeks, those with secure financial options and the confidence to find a home site unseen can still find the right home for them.

Housing Market Expectations in 2020

Devon Thorsby | April 2, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic has reduced homebuying and selling activity. Here’s how it could impact the housing market for the rest of 2020.

What Take Off Your Must-Have Home List

Steven Gottlieb | April 1, 2020

Don't let your vision of your dream house cloud your judgment on which details you really need in a home.

All About Tenant Rights in New Jersey

Devon Thorsby | March 31, 2020

Here are the basics you should know if you find yourself disagreeing with your landlord.

What to Do If You Can't Pay Rent

Devon Thorsby | March 27, 2020

Orders to close businesses have left many people without income. Here's what to know about making rent amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

DIY Projects That Add Value to Your Home

Mady Dahlstrom, Devon Thorsby | March 26, 2020

While you're spending extra time at home, add value to your house with these easy do-it-yourself projects.

How to Set Up a Home Gym

Devon Thorsby | March 25, 2020

Create a home gym setup that will encourage you to stay active as you shelter in place.

What's the Cost of Living in New York?

Lisa Larson | March 24, 2020

What does it take to afford one of the most expensive cities in the world? Here is a breakdown of the cost of living in the Big Apple.

'For Sale by Owner' the Right Way

Maryalene LaPonsie | March 23, 2020

Selling your house without an agent can save you thousands, but you could lose money if you don't do it correctly.

10 Secrets to Selling Your Home Faster

Teresa Mears, Devon Thorsby | March 20, 2020

Consider these low-cost ways to sell a home fast by attracting buyers with great photos, fresh curb appeal and social media buzz.

How to Disinfect Your Home

Devon Thorsby, Melissa Shin | March 20, 2020

Pay attention to high-touch areas of your home – especially those you don't normally disinfect.

Can Virtual Staging Help Sell Your Home?

Dima Williams | March 20, 2020

Any staging is better than none, a stager says, but virtual versus physical staging is a decision with sale and profit implications.

How Do I Find My Property Lines?

Devon Thorsby | March 19, 2020

Determining property lines can provide you with information for needed legal changes to your home and backyard.

Virtual Tools for Homebuyers

Devon Thorsby | March 18, 2020

Social distancing doesn't have to prohibit your ability to buy a home. These virtual tools can aid in the deal.

What to Know If Buying New Construction

Wendy Arriz | March 17, 2020

You have the chance to avoid the headache and hassle of construction and move into your brand-new dream home.

Coronavirus Leads to Low Mortgage Rates

Devon Thorsby | March 16, 2020

Economic uncertainty in the wake of COVID-19 sends mortgage rates historically low, and it might be the right time to buy or refinance.

States With the Lowest Property Taxes

Devon Thorsby | March 11, 2020

Median property taxes in these states are the lowest in the U.S.

What to Know About Moving to Hawaii

Devon Thorsby | March 6, 2020

Get ready for sun, sand and a high cost of living if you're considering a move to Hawaii.

5 Reasons You’re Still Renting

Steven Gottlieb | March 6, 2020

Financial, personal and professional factors may lead you to put off homeownership. Should you remain a renter indefinitely?