Houses in suburban neighborhood

Knowing the exact property lines makes it easier to complete a renovation project or move forward with buying a home. (Getty Images)

When you look at your house and yard, you're fairly confident you know your property lines. The neighbor's fence and where you mow your grass all seem to match the boundaries between other houses on your street. A fence here and there may slightly stray into someone else's yard, but for the most part everything seems about right.

Now imagine being so wrong about your property lines that your house is built on the completely wrong lot.

It’s happened before. Jonathon Lord, managing partner for Carolina Land Surveying, based in Little River, South Carolina, recalls a situation when a house was built without having a survey done. Instead, the builder and homeowner eyeballed the spot they felt would be right for the house.

"Come to find out they were on the common area (for the neighborhood) and not the actual lot," Lord says. The homeowner ended up having to purchase the common space from the homeowners association to right the error.

Much smaller mistakes, or discrepancies between documents, can lead to costly issues if you and a neighbor disagree over the location of your property line, whether it's a couple inches or a couple yards. To steer clear of conflicts, avoid making any changes to the edges of your property that could lead to a problem, monetary or otherwise, down the line.

[Read: 4 Sites That Will Tell You More than You Want to Know About Your Home.]

Why You Must Know Your Property Lines

From permits to purchases, being able to identify your property lines accurately makes it much easier to complete a project or move forward with a transaction.

In most official cases, having a new survey done is the way to go. "Let's say, for example, you want to build a swimming pool, and you're not 100 percent sure where that easement is. You could have a new survey done," explains Cynthia Durham Blair, a residential real estate closing attorney based in Columbia, South Carolina, and president of the American Land Title Association.

Additionally, when you purchase a home, it's not uncommon for your mortgage lender to require a new survey be conducted on the property. Even when that's not the case, your title insurance company will likely recommend a new survey as well, so you know if the neighbor's garage reaches over onto the property or if the outdoor kitchen encroaches on a sewer easement, which could be costly to remove down the line.

Durham Blair says issues discovered in the new survey of the property may not be covered in the standard owner’s title insurance policy, but knowing those concerns before you close could help you decide if you need to renegotiate with the seller or walk away from the deal entirely.

How Do I Find My Property Lines?

Your property lines were established when your neighborhood was originally developed, whether that's 10 years ago or a century ago. The property lines are noted in a couple different locations, including in the legal description for the lot, which would be on your property deed, and on a plat map, which is typically available through your local assessor's office or planning office.

A plat map shows property outlines for an entire neighborhood or area. On a standard residential street, you can expect to see rectangles all about the same size lined up on each side of the street, which signify each privately owned property. Every individual property will be labeled with an identifying number, which is the parcel number assigned when the lots are planned for separate sale and follow surrounding parcel numbers in numerical order. Your deed should note the parcel number, but you can typically find the parcel information if you look up your home through your local assessor's office, many of which have online databases.

A property's legal description is most easily found on the deed to the property, and there are a few ways the description can be written. It could simply describe the property’s exact location as it exists on the plat map, or it may include specific details with precise measurements that allow you to walk the property lines from a nearby reference point.

But being able to perfectly translate the legal description to establish the physical boundaries on your property can be quite the feat if you’re not trained to do so. Many properties have hidden markers at the corners that, if found, can help you find your bounds, though hiring a professional surveyor to reestablish your property lines will give you the most accurate answer.

[See: 10 Home Renovations Under $5,000.]

Here are your options for finding your property lines:

Hiring a Surveyor

For existing residential properties, a surveyor specializes in making precise measurements to locate the legal boundaries of a plot of land and any improvements to the property, from the house and driveway to a swimming pool or backyard shed. Surveyors also play a vital role when developing land to determine new property lines, locate the property location of a building to meet zoning and code requirements and more.

Taking the details from the legal description and plat map, a surveyor carefully measures the legal boundaries of your property. When the original survey is completed, metal bars are often buried at the corner points of the property. To help you see the corners or boundary lines, a surveyor will likely leave wooden stakes or flags in the ground at those spots as a temporary reference for you.



The complexity of a survey depends entirely on the geography of the area, what's on your property and what surrounds it. In an area where homes were built relatively recently and there are few trees, a survey could be completed as quickly as 30 to 45 minutes, says Mike Stanley, owner of Stanley Land Surveying, based in the Huntsville, Alabama, metro area.

But in an older neighborhood, where lots of properties have fences up and established trees, "a half acre could take you two to three hours," he says.

Hiring a surveyor is certainly the most accurate way to find out your property lines, but it isn't cheap. HomeAdvisor reports the typical price range to hire a land surveyor is between $339 and $671, with the national average at just about $500. Depending on the size of your property and where you live, you could see that price rising close to $1,000, according to HomeAdvisor.

Required or not, Durham Blair points to having a new survey done – or referring to one conducted in the last few years – as a way to play it safe when buying a property and doing home improvements. Otherwise, you could find that you need to pay to remove an addition to your house or take out a swimming pool because it encroaches on the neighbor's land or is going to be a part of planned road expansion. Those fixes, Durham Blair says, are "going to be problematic, and they're going to be costly."

[Read: 5 Must-Ask Questions About Code Violations in Your Home.]

Finding Property Lines on Your Own

Whether your local government doesn't require a survey to build a fence, or you're simply curious as to what your property lines are, you may be able to locate your property lines on your own.

"In the newest subdivisions, (homeowners) can kind of do it themselves, if they're comfortable with a tape measure," Lord says. Neighborhoods that have been developed more recently may have a permanent boundary marker on the surface of the ground – often a cap for a steel bar, or rebar, that is buried below. By following the specific details of the legal description, you should be able to locate your property lines from point to point.

Even if your property doesn't have visible corner markers, you may be able to go hunting for those buried markers with a metal detector. The metal poles, often made of rebar, can be buried up to 10 inches below the surface. Use a metal detector until it indicates metal is there, then dig to be sure what you've found is the marker.

Before you dig for the marker, be sure you know the location of any buried wires or irrigation systems to avoid causing damage. The universal phone number for U.S. homeowners to request buried utility information is 811, and within a few days' notice someone from your local utility company should be able to mark county wires or pipes with spray paint.

Don't use fence lines or your neighbor’s garden as a point of reference, however. Just because you've assumed that's where your property ends doesn't mean it's accurate. "If the fence was built and they didn't get a survey, they built it where they thought the line would be," rather than where it actually is, Stanley says.


8 Types of Roads That Can Have a Big Impact on Home Sales

The rule is "location, location, location" for a reason.

Street in Salem, Oregon in the fall.

(Getty Images)

A house hunter’s must-have list for a new home often includes the number of bedrooms, necessary appliance updates and maybe a garage or backyard. But one detail that's often left off is actually just outside the property lines – and it's a major deal-breaker for homebuyers. The road your house is located on, backs up to or is even in the general vicinity of can have a significant impact on your home's resale value and how long it takes for you to find a buyer. Before you buy your dream home on a busy street or near a railroad, consider how these road features can become a major turnoff for future buyers.

High-traffic road

High-traffic road

Traffic jam

(Getty Images)

Living off of a road that sees a lot of cars going back and forth throughout the day can make for a hassle getting in and out of the driveway. Plus, others generally have a lower opinion of homes located on a busy street, says Greg Hague, CEO of Real Estate Mavericks, a real estate coaching firm based in Scottsdale, Arizona. “If you go in most of these homes, there would be some perceptible traffic noise, but it’s not worth a home being 30 percent less – the reason is because of the perception of a home on a busy road and the difficulty selling it,” he says. It might take more time on the market and a lower asking price to entice buyers than a similar home on a quieter street.

Cul-de-sac

Cul-de-sac

Aerial view of residential housing development

(Getty Images)

The farther inside the neighborhood you go, the less traffic you’ll experience and the more desirable the houses typically become, explains Roberta Parker, a real estate agent for Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Fox & Roach, Realtors in Princeton, New Jersey. By only having one entrance and exit to the street, a cul-de-sac keeps traffic minimal, which is a big selling point down the line. “A cul-de-sac is your best investment,” Parker says.

Dirt road

Dirt road

Multicolored lupines grow in profusion along an unpaved road in Sugar Hill, New Hampshire

(Getty Images)

Some people prefer to get away from high-traffic counts so much that they’ll leave pavement altogether. A dirt or gravel road will certainly attract fewer cars, but any buyer considering a home on an unpaved road should factor in the hassle of everything getting dirty a lot easier and more often. “Your car gets dirty, your house gets dirty – your house gets dirty as other cars drive by,” Hague explains. While this might not be a hassle to you, consider the greater difficulty you’ll have selling the home, as many homebuyers prefer a fully paved road for convenience.

Near a traffic light

Near a traffic light

USA, New York, New York City, Green stoplight with winter trees in background

(Getty Images)

Even if your area doesn't experience high traffic volume throughout the day, having a traffic light within eyesight of your home can be irritating for residents. Timothy Somers, a real estate appraiser and partner at the appraisal firm Davis M. Somers Co. in Ann Arbor, Michigan, lives near a traffic light. For him, it’s the noise from idling cars at the red light that can be a bit of a hassle. “It can get noisy at times – not so much the traffic, but the loud music and that sort of stuff is annoying,” he says.

Double yellow line

Double yellow line

The road surface of a Tennessee mountain road, seen from ground level.

(Getty Images)

The property might not seem busy when you visit on the weekend. But if the home is located on a two-lane road with a double yellow line to prevent cars from passing each other – most often found in less populated suburban or rural areas – Parker says it’s a red flag that a lot of cars use the road. “A double yellow line is an indication that there is more traffic, and it’s not typical of just a neighborhood. A double yellow line is a serious road,” she says.

Highway within sight

Highway within sight

Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Monica.

(Getty Images)

Regardless of how far you have to travel for work, a home next to an on-ramp is not ideal, for both the noise pollution and the difficulty you’ll have trying to sell it in the future. Parker says every day many residents in Princeton commute an hour up to New York City, about an hour down to Philadelphia and even farther in either direction. But any driving time saved getting to the highway likely isn't worth it. Rather than living right next to highways and on main roads, neighborhoods are set up to provide convenient access to commuting options without having to sacrifice a quieter home environment. “It’s the most ideal location in terms of major roads that you don’t have to live on, but you’re nearby for convenience,” Parker says.

Railroad

Railroad

Closeup of railroad tracks

(Getty Images)

With a railroad near your home you have a whole new type of car to be concerned about. Trains are loud to begin with, but they’ll often create more noise coming out of tunnels or into stations to ensure the track is clear. “Some people would shy away from a location like that. … When a freight train rolls through it clanks, and there’s horns and more noise,” Somers says. If you’re considering buying a house near a railroad, find out how often it’s used and the times of day trains will pass by – a regular midnight freight train passing through could keep you up at night in your new home.

Corner lot on the block

Corner lot on the block

House on the corner

(Getty Images)

Attitudes toward a corner spot within a neighborhood can vary depending on an individual’s preference, but Somers says over time opinions have generally evolved into a preference for an interior lot. “Corner lots back in the ‘50s and ‘60s were a premium site. Today people will steer clear of them; they don’t like them as well,” Somers says. “Because of the yard configuration, they usually end up with a small backyard and large side yard. It’s less appealing than the standard interior lot. Plus, they’ve got twice the sidewalk to shovel.”


Tags: real estate, housing, existing home sales, pending home sales, new home sales, mortgages, home improvements


Devon Thorsby is the Real Estate editor at U.S. News & World Report, where she writes consumer-focused articles about the homebuying and selling process, home improvement, tenant rights and the state of the housing market.

She has appeared in media interviews across the U.S. including National Public Radio, WTOP (Washington, D.C.) and KOH (Reno, Nevada) and various print publications, as well as having served on panels discussing real estate development, city planning policy and homebuilding.

Previously, she served as a researcher of commercial real estate transactions and information, and is currently a member of the National Association of Real Estate Editors. Thorsby studied Political Science at the University of Michigan, where she also served as a news reporter and editor for the student newspaper The Michigan Daily. Follow her on Twitter or write to her at dthorsby@usnews.com.

Recommended Articles

The Best Places to Live for the Weather

Devon Thorsby | April 24, 2019

Where would you move to enjoy blue skies and sunshine year-round?

What to Consider Before Signing a Lease

Geoff Williams | April 23, 2019

Before you commit to signing a lease, consider these expert-backed tips.

Best Places to Live for Quality of Life

Devon Thorsby | April 19, 2019

These metro areas offer the best education, access to health services and crime rates.

Why Spring Is the Perfect Time to Sell

Devon Thorsby | April 17, 2019

Spring is here and interest rates are low – it's a great time to make the most of eager buyers.

Home Selling: Real Estate Team vs. Agent

Dima Williams | April 17, 2019

Solo agents are an industry standard, but teams offer a novel alternative. Here's what sets the two arrangements apart.  

The Priciest Repairs for Homebuyers

Lisa Larson | April 16, 2019

Avoid the repairs that will cost you the most before you move in with a sharp eye and the right inspections.

The Best Places to Live in New York

Devon Thorsby | April 12, 2019

Find out where in the Empire State you'll find the best opportunities.

What’s Dragging Down Your Home's Value?

Devon Thorsby | April 10, 2019

Find out why your home isn't worth as much as you think.

Do Home Value Estimate Tools Work?

Teresa Mears, Devon Thorsby | April 10, 2019

Homeowners now have more control over how home value estimates are calculated.

DIY Projects That Add Value to Your Home

Mady Dahlstrom | April 10, 2019

These are the home improvement projects that will add value to your home when selling.

Are These New Hot Spots Too Expensive?

Devon Thorsby | April 9, 2019

In places where net migration is highest, housing costs are rising fast.

The Best Affordable Places to Live 2019

Devon Thorsby | April 9, 2019

When it comes to housing costs, these metro areas allow your paycheck to go further.

The 25 Best Places to Live in the U.S.

Devon Thorsby | April 9, 2019

These metro areas offer the best combination of jobs, desirability, cost of living, quality of life and more.

Why a Real Estate Agent's Advice Works

Steven Gottlieb | April 8, 2019

The advice your real estate agent offers can help you close the right deal to buy or sell your home.

Selling Your House in a Buyer's Market

Wendy Arriz | April 2, 2019

Five steps to ensure the right buyer sees your home.

Climate Change May Impact Home Values

Geoff Williams | March 29, 2019

With sea level rise accelerating, waterfront real estate values could be revalued sooner than you think.

How to Make Your Open House Memorable

Sally Forster Jones | March 28, 2019

How to prepare your home for a day of showings that will make buyers want to put in an offer.

What Is a BPO in Real Estate?

Devon Thorsby | March 20, 2019

Here's what to know about a broker price opinion, how it's calculated and if you should get one.

Are You Ready To Buy a Home?

Wendy Arriz | March 19, 2019

For the millennial generation, homeownership can still be intimidating. Here's what you should consider before making an offer.

Decorate Your Apartment on the Cheap

Devon Thorsby | March 15, 2019

A short lease doesn't mean you can't make your apartment feel like home.