9 Items to Never Leave Outside Your House

Left unattended, these prized possessions could get damaged, go missing or even hurt someone.

By Devon Thorsby, Editor, Real Estate |April 25, 2018, at 10:59 a.m.

9 Items to Never Leave Outside Your House

Slideshow

Put your property inside.

backyard of an old abandonded building in vienna

(Getty Images)

Your home is your castle, and your domain extends to the farthest reaches of your property lines – even if that’s just a few feet from your house. While it may be tempting to leave some items outside your home – for convenience, appeal or simply because you ran out of time to clean them up – you may find that the risks outweigh the benefits. Items left outside can attract pests, thieves or become a safety hazard. Here are nine things you don’t want to leave outside your house.

Spare house key

Spare house key

A man's hand is picking up or returning key under the door mat

(Getty Images)

Under your welcome mat or that decorative turtle in your garden may seem like the perfect spot to hide a spare key for the kids or in case you lock yourself out, but it’s also easy for would-be burglars to find. Even if you have an armed security system, with key access a burglar can grab the nearest item of value and be long gone before the police show up. Keep spare keys with a family member who lives nearby or a trustworthy neighbor.

Bicycles

Bicycles

Retro bicycle on roadside with vintage brick wall background

(Getty Images)

More than 184,000 bicycles were reported stolen nationwide in 2016, according to the FBI, and it’s likely many more went unreported. As you would lock up your bike outside a business or school, you need to secure it when you’re home. An ideal spot is in the garage, tucked in a corner inside the house or in a backyard shed to protect your bike from rain and snow that can cause it to rust and your tires to lose air.

Kids' toys

Kids' toys

Childs Colourful Tricycle and other toys in country garden. Canon 5D RAW conversion (XL). No sharpening applied. More similar toys  Here .

(Getty Images)

Cleanup time may be the hardest part of ending an active day outside with the kids, but it’s a necessary step to prevent future problems. Rain-soaked toys can grow mold, serve as a breeding ground for pests like mosquitoes and break down faster over time. If a passerby trips on a scooter left on the sidewalk, you’re potentially liable for damages. Or if a stranger swipes some rollerblades or a baseball glove, the toys are likely covered as personal property under your homeowners insurance, but they're not pricey enough to file a claim. “The question is whether it would fall below the deductible,” says Jim Taylor, head of claims compliance, quality and customer experience for Farmers Insurance.

Packages

Packages

Hagerstown, MD, USA - June 2, 2014: Image of an Amazon packages. Amazon is an online company and is the largest retailer in the world.

(Getty Images)

A lonesome package on your stoop is an easy target for thieves. In November 2017, InsuranceQuotes reported that 25.9 million Americans have had a package stolen around the holidays – the time of year people are most likely to receive package deliveries. If you can’t be home to receive the package, inquire with your employer to see if delivery to your office is OK. Alternatively, you can opt to pick up packages ordered through Amazon at an Amazon Locker location. Set the nearest locker location as your delivery address, and you’ll receive a code to open the locker once the package has been delivered.

Indoor furniture

Indoor furniture

a worn antique yellow couch sits outside in a back yard on bright green grass with a gray wooden fence behind

(Getty Images)

Everyone loves an outdoor living setup, but that doesn’t mean literally bringing your living room furniture outside. Upholstered furniture meant for inside isn’t equipped to handle outdoor weather and can mold, break down or even become the perfect nest for rodents and other pests. “It’s not designed to be out in the elements, to be in the wind and the rain and the different seasons, so there could be deterioration, wear and tear, rot that happens to that furniture,” Taylor says.

Trash

Trash

Poor open place with trash.

(Getty Images)

For a number of reasons, it's important to keep the yard free of trash or other belongings you no longer care for. “Many [insurance] carriers have conditions in the policy regarding appropriate maintenance of dwelling and the personal property,” Taylor says. “If there’s a rotting couch sitting in front of your home and the insurer goes to conduct an inspection for underwriting eligibility, that could be an indication – along with if there was excessive debris or appliances outside, trash piled up – of a lack of pride of ownership, and a potential hazard that the insurer may not want to accept.” Plus, piles of trash outside will likely irk your neighbors and can lead to fines from the homeowners association, city or county for violating debris ordinances.

Electronics and appliances

Electronics and appliances

A pair of lounge chairs on a stone patio.

(Getty Images)

Not every electronic or appliance left outside is trash – in some cases, you may simply be looking to improve the outdoor living aesthetic with a TV and decent sound system. But most standard electronics and appliances are not fit to endure extreme heat, cold or precipitation – and when exposed to the elements for long periods can easily become garbage. While there are products made for the outdoors, including TVs and refrigerators, they’re often still unable to withstand everything Mother Nature will throw at them. Most outdoor TVs are recommended for shaded spots – to avoid the heat of direct sunlight – and many refrigerators function best when temperatures don’t dip below freezing.

Your pets

Your pets

chained dog looking sad and laying

(Getty Images)

While it’s not as common of a practice as in previous decades, keeping a dog chained up outside or letting a cat roam the neighborhood is still the norm for some pet owners. Animal rights organization American Humane warns against leaving a pet outside when you’re not there to supervise. Outdoor cats are more likely to contract diseases and be exposed to the dangers of aggressive animals, traffic and parasites. Additionally, American Humane says a dog that stays outside all day doesn’t get the care most dogs need. “Abandoned, but chained up, backyard dogs cannot move to comfort, shelter or companionship,” American Humane says on its website.

Unsecured hazards

Unsecured hazards

Backyard with outdoor inground residential swimming pool, garden, deck and stone patio

(Getty Images)

An in-ground swimming pool and trampoline aren’t items you can exactly bring inside at the end of the day, but it is important you secure access to these major toys to prevent someone from getting hurt. “If that trampoline is sitting out and it’s not fenced in, anybody could walk in off the street and start bouncing up and down on the trampoline. That could potentially create what’s known as an attractive nuisance,” Taylor says, which is something that makes it easy for passersby – kids, in particular – to put themselves in harm’s way on your property. To avoid this, fencing a trampoline or pool make people less likely to be in danger on your property.

Read More
AD

Learn More


Devon Thorsby is the Real Estate editor at U.S. News & World Report, where she writes consumer-focused articles about the homebuying and selling process, home improvement, tenant rights and the state of the housing market.

She has appeared in media interviews across the U.S. including National Public Radio, WTOP (Washington, D.C.) and KOH (Reno, Nevada) and various print publications, as well as having served on panels discussing real estate development, city planning policy and homebuilding.

Previously, she served as a researcher of commercial real estate transactions and information, and is currently a member of the National Association of Real Estate Editors. Thorsby studied Political Science at the University of Michigan, where she also served as a news reporter and editor for the student newspaper The Michigan Daily. Follow her on Twitter or write to her at dthorsby@usnews.com.

Recommended Articles

What to Know: Tenant Rights in Texas

Devon Thorsby | Feb. 15, 2019

Here's how renters in Texas fare when facing a dispute with their landlord.

Measuring Your Home's Square Footage

Devon Thorsby | Feb. 13, 2019

Know exactly how big your house is, and maximize the way you use it.

5 Travel-Inspired Home Decorating Ideas

Sally Forster Jones | Feb. 12, 2019

Transform your home's interior with a few simple projects that highlight the time you've spent in other parts of the world.

What to Know About a Pending Home Sale

Devon Thorsby | Feb. 8, 2019

As the buyer, seller or interested outside party, here's what you need to do while a real estate deal is pending.

10 Home Renovations Under $5,000

Devon Thorsby | Feb. 6, 2019

How to get the most impact from your renovation when you're on a tight budget.

4 Eco-Friendly Upgrades for Your Home

Sally Forster Jones | Feb. 6, 2019

You can improve your home with green features, but you don't have to sacrifice a sleek design.

What to Know: California Tenant Rights

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 30, 2019

What renters in the Golden State should know before they go toe-to-toe with their landlord.

How to Find a Room for Rent

Geoff Williams | Jan. 29, 2019

If you're relocating or you have poor credit, subletting a room can be a smart financial move.

The Best Places for Young Professionals

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 25, 2019

These places offer the job market, affordability and reputation recent grads are looking for.

First-Time Homebuyer Programs in Florida

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 25, 2019

State and local options provide financial assistance and teach about effective homeownership.

What Is a Condo – and Should I Buy One?

Geoff Williams | Jan. 23, 2019

Consider fees, association rules and mortgage rates before committing to condo ownership.

5 Healthy Enhancements for Your Home

Sally Forster Jones | Jan. 23, 2019

These easy changes to your home and how you maintain it can help you live healthier all year round.

How to Become a Real Estate Agent

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 18, 2019

Follow these steps to start on the path to being a successful real estate agent.

How to Find a Real Estate Agent

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 18, 2019

Here's how to find a real estate agent to help you confidently navigate a home sale or purchase.

How to Break Your Apartment Lease

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 18, 2019

Five options for you to end your rental contract before time is up.

How to Back Out of a Real Estate Deal

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 18, 2019

Here are your best options for bowing out of a home purchase or sale without ruffling too many feathers.

The Best Places to Live in Florida

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 18, 2019

See how the most populous metro areas in the Sunshine State compare to each other.

6 Tax Breaks for Homeowners

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 16, 2019

Keep these deductions in mind as your prepare for your next tax filing.

How to Tackle Major Home Winter Repairs

Devon Thorsby | Jan. 11, 2019

Avoid a bigger disaster when faced with freezing pipes, a broken window, power outage or roof leak.

Clever Tricks to Rejuvenate Your Home

Sally Forster Jones | Jan. 9, 2019

Simple improvements that will make your living space feel new again on a small budget.